The Texas judge who ordered same-sex marriage to end says he’s not surprised by state judge’s ruling

Two Texas judges on Wednesday said they were shocked by a Texas judge’s order to stop same-gender marriage.

The judge’s comments to the Texas Tribune show he didn’t see how the state could have a similar argument as one the U.S. Supreme Court made in June.

That case struck down state bans on gay marriage because it violates the constitutional guarantees of equality for gays and lesbians.

The Tribune’s editorial board said he’s “deeply disappointed” by the ruling, but he made clear he did not view it as a constitutional crisis.

He said the state will not be going back to court and that he will not issue marriage licenses to same- gender couples.

The ruling is an “important step forward,” said the Tribune’s editor, Jeff Langer.

But Langer noted that the Supreme Court “has not yet ruled on the validity of a similar case in California, and its ruling does not resolve the question of how to interpret and apply the state’s ban on same- sex marriage.”

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The decision in June by Texas Supreme Court Justice Carlos Garcia to temporarily block gay marriage in the state is one of several legal challenges by same- and lesbian couples challenging state bans.

The ruling in the Texas case came in the wake of similar rulings by a federal appeals court in Oklahoma and Utah, where the Supreme Justice has also ruled same- gay marriage is unconstitutional.

A federal judge in Kansas issued a nationwide injunction in April halting the state bans and said he was considering appealing the decision.

The U.C.L.A. law banning same-Sex Marriage was written in 1978 and was intended to protect the religious freedom of churches and other institutions.

Same-sex couples should be allowed to marry in New York

The same-sex marriage equality bill passed the state Senate yesterday.

The vote was 48-48.

New York State has now passed a law allowing same-gender couples to marry.

This is a huge victory for LGBT people in the state, and New Yorkers can now begin to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

We’ll have more coverage on the marriage equality battle as the legislation becomes law.